Category Archives: Hawaiian Food

E Malama I Ke Kai Annual Awareness Fundraiser

This year Punana Leo o Kawaiaha’o will be holding their annual “E Malama I ke Kai Awareness Fundraiser on Saturday May 14th, from 10am to 3pm at Kapi’olani Park Bandstand, Honolulu, HI.

E Malama I ke Kai means to care for the sea, basically an annual ocean awareness fundraiser that has been hosted by Punana Leo o Kawaiaha’o for a little over a decade. This event is a free concert with exhibitors and activities to support Punana Leo o Kawaiaha’o one of the Hawaiian immersion preschools on the island of O’ahu.

Punana Leo o Kawaiaha’o has fostered a unique connection to the ocean through its teachers who engage their students in ocean awareness because they themselves are great watermen and women. Punana Leo o Kawaiaha’o is trying to obtain a more sustainable learning community through their curriculum, making ocean awareness a must because the ocean is an important part of the Hawaiian culture.

The event will feature an outrigger canoe race from Maunalua Bay to Waikiki, followed by environmental education arts and crafts, games for the whole family, good food, and great entertainment. Last year approximately 5,000 people attended this event.

Having attended this event in the past I believe that it is a great way to get the community involved in learning about the local ocean conservation as well as perpetuating the Hawaiian language and culture with all the art exhibits and activities.

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19th Annual Celebration of the Arts

The Annual Celebration of the Arts is an event that happens every year bringing Hawaii’s finest artisans, educators, cultural practitioners, speakers, and entertainers together for the Hawai’i community. Throughout this weekend from April 22-24 the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Kapalua, Maui is hosting the event.

This year’s theme for the celebration is , “E na Aumakua,” which is in honor of our ancestors. Clifford Nae’ole who is the cultural advisor and event chair said that this years theme, “Embraces the call to our ancestors and all things natural.”

The event includes a full schedule of cultural panels, films, hands-on art, demonstrations, music and dance. According to the Hawaii Tourism Association this event is a past recipient of the “Keep it Hawai’i Kahili Award” and was rated as the number one cultural event by the Hawai’i Modern Luxury Magazine.

The event opens with traditional ceremonies at sunrise on Friday, April 22 and concludes with a Celebration Lu’au and Show on Saturday night, April 23, followed by an after-hours party at the hotel lobby.  There will also be an Easter Brunch and Easter Egg Hunt on the Plantation Lawn on Sunday, April 24th.

Most of the events try to incorporate earth day in their activities along with the theme which is honoring our ancestors. I believe that this is a great way to get the community involved with learning cultural practices as well as the Hawaiian language through a series of fun events.

Taken from the 2010 Annual Celebration of the Arts:

Pulama Mauli Ola is Back Again!!

Last Saturday February 19th, Ke Kula ‘O Nawahiokalani’opu’u the Hawaiian immersion elementary and high school  and Punana Leo o Hilo the Hawaiian immersion preschool located in Puna, Hawai’i hosted their 8th annual Pulama Mauli Ola concert and fundraiser. This was a public event for the Puna and Hilo districts, having free admission for the community.

The concert included the Hawaiian immersion schools themselves performing oli (chanting), mele (singing) and hula (Hawaiian dance), a variety of local Hawaiian musicians, Hula Halau’s (Hawaiian dance groups), as well as solo performances from students and teachers who have a passion for music.

Besides the great performances, the ‘Ono (delicious) food and the fundraising vendors brought to you by the school is what brings most of the community said senior Aloha Andaya-Bohol. The food options were traditional Hawaiian dishes such as, laulau, kalua pig, lomi salmon, etc, to local Hawaiian barbeque favorites such as steak plates prepared by the students and faculty.

Other events include the keiki (children) activities which were modern games, but also integrated with pa’ani kahiko (traditional Hawaiian games), the educational fair where outreach programs or small local businesses come to promote their mission or products, and hana noe’au (a craft fair) selling Hawaiian arts, crafts and clothing.

Although the entire concert and fundraiser was hosted in both the Hawaiian and English language I believe it is a great way for the community to immerse themselves in the Hawaiian language and culture by supporting these schools.